People's Stories Children's Rights


130 million girls didn’t go to school today
by ONE, Plan International, CARE, agencies
 
May 2017
 
130 million girls didn’t go to school today. Not because they didn’t want to, but because they weren’t given the chance.
 
They are denied an education for a variety of reasons, from cultural norms and costs, to violence and extremism. The result is that these 130 million girls don’t have a fair chance to live a decent and productive life, and the entire world misses out by not benefitting from their potential.
 
This is a global crisis. We need to sound the alarm to our elected officials. It’s up to all of us to push them to mobilize resources and support key policy reforms that get these girls in school.
 
130 million is a big number. But this isn’t about numbers: It’s about real girls with hopes and dreams being denied the fair chance of a future.
 
The leaders of the world’s 20 biggest economies are meeting soon in Hamburg, Germany. This G20 Class of 2017 could get top marks by agreeing to support new financing and policies that would help get every girl into school. Or they could fall further behind by doing nothing.
 
Poverty is sexist - it hits girls and women hardest. But educate a girl in one of the world’s poorest countries, and it can dramatically improve her health, wealth, and potential. She’s less likely to become a child bride, experience violence or contract HIV. And she could help lift her family — and her entire country — out of poverty.
 
If you agree that all girls count, add your name to send G20 leaders their report card now.
 
G20 leaders, 130 million girls are not in school. That’s unacceptable. I’m counting on you to put in place adequate financing and policies to help ensure that every girl, in every country, gets the education she deserves. I believe girls count - I hope you do too.
 
http://act.one.org/sign/g20-girls-count/ http://www.malala.org/girls-education http://www.ungei.org/index.php http://plan-international.org/because-i-am-a-girl/girls-education# http://www.care.org/work/education/girls-education http://www.unwomen.org/en/news/in-focus/girl-child http://bit.ly/2pMEyTR
 
* Save the Children. Every Last Girl Report: http://bit.ly/2d960RJ


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1.4 million children at risk of death as famine looms in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Yemen
by UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake
 
28 March 2017
 
Time is running out for children as famine, drought and war threaten millions
 
More than a month after famine was declared in South Sudan, time is running out for more than a million children as drought and armed conflict devastate lives in northeast Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen, UNICEF said today.
 
“Children can’t wait for yet another famine declaration before we take action,” said Manuel Fontaine, UNICEF Director of Emergency Programmes. “We learned from Somalia in 2011 that by the time famine was announced, untold numbers of children had already died. That can’t happen again.”
 
Some 22 million children have been left hungry, sick, displaced and out of school in the four countries, UNICEF said. Nearly 1.4 million are at imminent risk of death this year from severe malnutrition.
 
UNICEF will require close to $255 million to provide these children with food, water, health, education and protection services for just the next few months, according to a new funding update.
 
Most of the funds – over $81 million – will go towards nutrition programmes to screen children for malnutrition and provide them with therapeutic food.
 
An additional $53 million will be allocated to health services including vaccinations, while over $47 million will go to water, sanitation and hygiene programmes to prevent potentially deadly diahorreal diseases.
 
The remaining funds will help protect children affected by conflict and displacement and provide them with education services. Cash assistance will also be offered to the most vulnerable families.
 
The resources needed over the next few months are part of a broader appeal for all of 2017, totaling $712 million – a 50 per cent increase over funding requirements in the four countries at the same time last year.
 
UNICEF has been working with partners in the four countries to respond to the famine threat and prevent it from spreading:
 
• In northeast Nigeria, UNICEF will reach 3.9 million people with emergency primary healthcare services this year, treat 220,000 severely malnourished children under the age of five, and provide more than a million people with access to safe water.
 
• In Somalia, UNICEF is supporting 1.7 million children under-five years of age, including the treatment of up to 277,500 severe acute malnutrition cases through facility-based and mobile health and nutrition services.
 
• In South Sudan, UNICEF, together with partners, has delivered life-saving assistance to 128,000 people in areas affected or threatened by famine, including almost 30,000 children under the age of five.
 
• In Yemen, UNICEF has scaled up activities to respond to malnutrition through health facilities, mobile teams, community health workers and volunteers reaching hard-to-access communities and displaced families. UNICEF is also supporting severely acutely malnourished children and their families with cash assistance and water and sanitation services, including the provision of safe water, supplies and hygiene promotion.
 
Armed conflict is a major driver of this crisis, UNICEF said, calling for unconditional, unimpeded and sustainable access to the children in need and an end to the violations of children’s rights in the affected countries.
 
UNICEF also sounded the alarm about a worsening nutrition situation in neighbouring countries.
 
“As violence, hunger and thirst force people to move within and across borders, malnutrition rates will continue to soar not just in these four countries, but also in the Lake Chad basin and the Greater Horn of Africa,” Fontaine said. “If humanitarian agencies do net get the access and resources they need to reach the most vulnerable, lives will be lost.” http://uni.cf/2o1feci
 
21 February 2017
 
Almost 1.4 million children are at imminent risk of death from severe acute malnutrition this year, as famine looms in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen, UNICEF said today.
 
“Time is running out for more than a million children,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake. “We can still save many lives. The severe malnutrition and looming famine are largely man-made. Our common humanity demands faster action. We must not repeat the tragedy of the 2011 famine in the Horn of Africa.”
 
In northeast Nigeria, the number of children with severe acute malnutrition is expected to reach 450,000 this year in the conflict-affected states of Adamawa, Borno and Yobi. Fews Net, the famine early warning system that monitors food insecurity, said late last year that famine likely occurred in some previously inaccessible areas of Borno states, and that it is likely ongoing, and will continue, in other areas which remain beyond humanitarian reach.
 
In Somalia, drought conditions are threatening an already fragile population battered by decades of conflict. Almost half the population, or 6.2 million people, are facing acute food insecurity and in need of humanitarian assistance. Some 185,000 children are expected to suffer from severe acute malnutrition this year, however this figure is expected to rise to 270,000 in the next few months.
 
In South Sudan, a country reeling from conflict, poverty and insecurity, over 270,000 children are severely malnourished. Famine has just recently been declared in parts of Unity State in the northern central part of the country, where 20,000 children live. The total number of food insecure people across the country is expected to rise from 4.9 million to 5.5 million at the height of the lean season in July if nothing is done to curb the severity and spread of the food crisis.
 
And in Yemen, where a conflict has been raging for the past two years, 462,000 children are currently suffering from severe acute malnutrition – a nearly 200 per cent increase since 2014.
 
This year, UNICEF is working with partners to provide therapeutic treatment to 220,000 severely malnourished children in Nigeria, over 200,000 severely malnourished children in South Sudan, more than 200,000 severely malnourished children in Somalia, and 320,000 children in Yemen.


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